The Earn This Podcast, Episode 12, Part 1 — History of the Grammy Award for Best New Artist (1960-1990)

 

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Shortly after the 2015 Grammy Awards aired (see Colton’s analysis of the major categories), Colton and I recorded a two-part podcast going through the history of the Best New Artist award. We took a look at the major nominees of every year and try to decide whether the committee chose a worthy candidate. Spoiler alert: They usually didn’t.

A few corrections and notes on this episode:

  • Embarrassingly, I couldn’t name any KC and the Sunshine Band singles off the top of my head, even though I knew that I knew at least one or two by name. Their most famous singles are “Shake Your Booty” and “That’s the Way I Like It.”
  • We struggled to remember the name of Elvis Costello’s backing band, landing on “The Imposters.” While that was the name of one of his backing bands in the 1990s, the band name I was thinking of was “The Attractions,” his most prominent backing band.
  • I mentioned that I know a song by Glass Tiger but couldn’t recall off the top of my head what song it is. It’s “Don’t Forget Me When I’m Gone.”
  • Colton mentioned a controversy around Katrina and the Waves featuring underage nudity on an album cover. I looked it up and see no record of this type of story for this band. Most likely, he was thinking of the controversy over Bow Wow Wow’s second album cover.

Listen to Part 2, covering 1990-2015 and containing our rank of the 5 best and worst picks in the award’s history

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Colton O.

Colton O.

Colton drinks straight out of coconuts and writes about music for Earn This. He joined the site in 2009.

Dan S.

Dan is the editor of Earn This. He co-founded the site in 2009.

One thought on “The Earn This Podcast, Episode 12, Part 1 — History of the Grammy Award for Best New Artist (1960-1990)

  1. That last bullet point is correct. This is a factoid I picked up from “I Love the 80’s” or something on VH1, which they brought up in association with the song “I Want Candy,” and I got it mixed up.

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